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Downtown Greenwood Farmers' Market Intro Photo

Downtown Greenwood Farmers’ Market

The Downtown Greenwood Farmers’ Market was established in 2008 as a project of Main Street Greenwood, a non-profit organization whose mission is to promote economic development and revitalization in this Delta town, once known as the Cotton Capital of the World.

Shiloh Seventh-day Adventist Church

Food brought Herman Sullivan to Shiloh Seventh-day Adventist Church in Greenwood, Mississippi. His high school principal was an elder member of the church and invited him to supper.

Carrboro Farmers' Market Photo

Carrboro Farmers’ Market

The Carrboro Farmers Market (CFM) has long been a place where consumers can purchase fresh produce, pastured meat, and homemade prepared foods from local farmers and artisans.

Woodson Ridge Farms

Originally from the Mississippi Delta, Elizabeth and Luke Heiskell relocated to Oxford in early 2011 to start Woodson Ridge Farms. Luke brought with him agricultural experience from farming cotton and soybeans in the Delta’s rich alluvial soil.

Lunch Houses of Acadiana Intro Photo

Lunch Houses of Acadiana

In the lunch houses of Acadiana, okra is revered, rice with gravy is a given, and almost every dish gets smothered. Here menus change daily, but are the same every week. Here a full day’s caloric allowance can be had for often less than 10 bucks.

New Orleans Sno-Balls Intro Photo

New Orleans Sno-Balls

First things first: a New Orleans sno-ball is not a snow cone, a pre-frozen, rock-hard concoction like those sold from ice cream trucks and concession stands elsewhere. As each of our New Orleans Sno-Balls oral history subjects attest, New Orleans sno is a product of locally made, carefully stored, and expertly shaved-to-order ice.

South Carolina State Icon

South Carolina BBQ

Like everything in South Carolina, we cook barbeque cantankerously. We smoke our meat with hundreds of opinions and often with a sense of injured pride. Otherwise, it’s just different in South Carolina—all the way down to the way we spell it, more often with the garish and trashy “q” rather than the upwardly mobile and buttoned-down “c.”

North Carolina State Icon

North Carolina BBQ

Never “home cooking” (it is simply too much trouble), until the early twentieth century barbecue [in North Carolina] was largely reserved for special occasions like harvests, fundraisers, and political rallies.

Southern BBQ Trail - SFA Documentary

Southern BBQ Trail

Barbecue, barbeque, bar-b-q, BBQ: there are almost as many spellings as there are kinds of barbecue, as if the proliferation of words could express the mastering tastes and aromas of the food, all the experiences that can fill the mouth, the place where also words begin.

Trails & Regional Projects

Southern BBQ Trail - SFA Documentary

Southern BBQ Trail

Barbecue, barbeque, bar-b-q, BBQ: there are almost as many spellings as there are kinds of barbecue, as if the proliferation of words could express the mastering tastes and aromas of the food, all the experiences that can fill the mouth, the place where also words begin.

Southern Gumbo Trail a Documentary from Southern Foodways Alliance

Southern Gumbo Trail

Gumbo. So many versions, so many cooks, so many contradictions. Such as: Only use a roux with poultry, filé with seafood. Use okra in the summer, filé in the winter. You have to have a chaurice in your gumbo. You must use andouille.

Southern Boudin Trail

Food is a tie that binds, a constant, an equalizer, or in the words of James Beard: “Food is our common ground, a universal experience.” Food can also function as one of the defining characteristics of regional and cultural identity. Boudin, a unique but simple culinary concoction of pork, rice, onions and various other herbs and spices squeezed in to a sausage casing and served hot, is one of those foods.

Hot Tamale Trail

Hot Tamale Trail

Better known for its association with cotton and catfish, the Mississippi Delta has a fascinating relationship with the tamale. In restaurants, on street corners, and in kitchens throughout the Delta, this very old and time-consuming culinary tradition is vibrant.