Good Ol’ Chico: Harvest of Hope

MacArthur Fellow Greg Asbed’s work has improved the lives of farm workers in the Sunshine State’s tomato fields for over twenty-five years.

Editor’s Note

I love this issue for shaking me—and, I hope, you, dear reader—out of my comfortable assumptions about this region.

The Sanctum of a Bloom

When I think of my mother walking toward that pear tree, I imagine her like Janie, the protagonist of Zora Neale Hurston’s master work, Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Trawling for Shrimp

Here I am in shrimp country, to see with my own eyes an industry that has been much maligned. If I’m going to cook with shrimp, I need to find a source I can trust.

What Is Latino Enough?

If I’m asking what is Latino enough, I’m a breath away from asking: What is American enough?

The Feast of Saint Mary

My maternal grandmother, mary gutierrez, whom I called Nana, died when I was ten. It would take me more than twenty years before I would have the courage to find my way back to her.

The Poor Man Rice Pudding

As told to Erin Byers Murray by Serigne Mbaye I was born in New York, but when I was five, my parents sent me to a boarding school in Senegal, where I spent my childhood. My parents were going through a lot, and I was the young one, so it was easier to ship me … Continued

Come Together

By Caroline Cox My mom laughs her pitchy laugh at inside jokes with her sister. The Clemson game buzzes in the background. Grandma passes around small plastic cups of fragrant ambrosia. We drain several bottles of cold, crisp Frontera. Mom says she buys it because she prefers Spanish wine, but I’m pretty sure it’s because … Continued

My Father’s South

By Maria Godoy Humberto Godoy was born and raised in Guatemala City. He wasn’t dirt poor, but he was poor enough that he had to shine shoes to buy pencils for school. Those pencils wrote him a new destiny: In 1954, he won a scholarship to attend what was then called Jacksonville State College in … Continued