Pensacola Pay Dirt

“If the Luna settlement had succeeded, the southeast might have become part of New Spain.”

O’Steen’s

O’Steens, a landmark seafood joint in St. Augustine, Florida, opened in 1964 or 1965—no one can quite remember when.

On This Week’s Gravy: What Is White Trash Cooking?

In 1986, Ernest Matthew Mickler of Palm Valley, Florida, published White Trash Cooking. It was a loving ode to his people—rural, white, working-class and poor Southerners—and their recipes: tuna casserole, baked possum, white-bread tomato sandwiches.

Next week on Gravy: White Trash Cooking

Next Thursday, Gravy interim producer Sarah Reynolds tells the story of White Trash Cooking, Ernie Mickler’s 1986 collection of stories and recipes from his North Florida home.

Growing up “Mix-Mix”

Filipino food is not easily comparable to Chinese or Japanese food. Because the Spanish colonized the Philippines, we share dishes with Latin cultures—adobo, menudo, flan. Rice, always white, is a hallmark.

Deadliest Throw by Joe York

At the Annual Interstate Mullet Toss, participants compete to throw a dead mullet the farthest across the Alabama-Florida state line.

Remember Florida’s Forgotten Coast

The Apalachicola Bay area is often referred to as Florida’s Forgotten Coast. In anticipation of next week’s Gravy podcast, tour the place and meet people in this beautiful fishing community.

New Oral History Project: Tampa Devil Crabs

The history of the devil crab and the Tampa cigar industry are inextricable. The story of this fried street food is deeply rooted in labor and immigration.