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Skylight Inn BBQ

Travel to North Carolina’s Skylight Inn, once declared the capital of ‘cue by National Geographic. A capital dome atop the building will confirm you’re at the right location. The Jones family cooks whole hog barbecue in open pits over oak, and then chops it–skin and all–on a wood chopping block.

Birmingham Hotdogs

A short profile in memory of Constantine “Gus” Koutroulakis of Pete’s Famous Hot Dogs in Birmingham, Alabama. Gus passed away on April 5, 2011, at the age of 81.

Taylor Grocery

The story of Mississippi’s Taylor Grocery, and proprietors Lynn and Debbie Hewlett. It’s hailed as the South’s best catfish joint and it has a brown bag policy. Diners don’t mind waiting on the front porch for a table, sometimes for hours.

Buttermilk: It Can Help

See the story of 2008 Ruth Fertel Keeper of the Flame winner Cruze Family Dairy, located outside of Knoxville, Tennessee. Hear proprietor Earl Cruze extol the virtues of buttermilk. It might not solve all the world’s problems, but it can help!

Carolina Rice

An exploration of rice cultivation and the rice kitchen, featuring SFA Fellow Glenn Roberts, underwritten by Biltmore Estate.

Urban Farming

A profile of downtown Birmingham’s not-for-profit demonstration education garden. Together with volunteers, Jones Valley Urban Farm turns vacant urban property into bountiful gardens and uses proceeds from produce and flower sales to fund educational programs.

Big Bob Gibson's Bar-B-Q - Don McLemore - Alabama - Southern BBQ Trail

Big Bob Gibson’s BBQ

A short profile of Big Bob Gibson’s Barbecue in Decatur, Alabama, produced for the annual Big Apple Barbecue Block Party, sponsored by Union Square Hospitality Group.

Dial S for bbq film -- Southside Market in Elgin, Texas

Dial S for Sausage

A short profile of Southside Market in Elgin, Texas, produced for the annual Big Apple Barbecue Block Party, sponsored by the Union Square Hospitality Group.

mutton: the movie film, owensboro, kentucky

Mutton Barbecue

Go on a journey to the northwestern corner of Kentucky (Owensboro, to be exact), where descendants of the Welsh who settled the banks of the Ohio River don’t count sheep; they barbecue them.