A Ghost in the Freezer

It wasn’t a recipe for creamed corn; it was her corn, made by her hands.

Pimento Cheese in a Parka

I expected to miss Southern food in my new hometown. I did not expect to spy a funhouse version of it around every corner.

The Big Tomato

In the 1960s, Piedmont Label boasted a booming art department. If something could be canned, Piedmont could label it: Brunswick stew from Georgia, oysters from Mississippi, gumbo from Louisiana, black-eyed peas from Tennessee, pet food from Washington, D.C.

Growing up “Mix-Mix”

Filipino food is not easily comparable to Chinese or Japanese food. Because the Spanish colonized the Philippines, we share dishes with Latin cultures—adobo, menudo, flan. Rice, always white, is a hallmark.

POND FRESH

Ed Scott formed a cooperative in 1971 in the area of Leflore County, Mississippi, known as Brooks Farm. The hope was that smaller farmers could, through the co-op, acquire loans and government support.

A Hamburger by Any Other Name

Found in small restaurants hugging railroads tracks that crisscross the counties of northeast Mississippi, northwestern Alabama, and lower Tennessee, these hamburgers defy hunger and solitude in a region where many workers worry over their next paycheck.

Half That Tater by Mark Essig

The Welcome Table serves as many as 600 meals a week, in six seatings, to one of the most diverse groups of people I have ever seen at table. An older man with an expensive haircut and black-framed glasses. Couples with babies. Young men carrying backpacks, neatly loaded, ready for another night of camping in the woods along the river.

Good Fortune by Osayi Endolyn

“What’s Hoppin’ John?” I asked no one in particular. It was 2013, and I was working as a host and server’s assistant at Empire State South in Midtown Atlanta.