Courtesy of Jim Peppler.

Bottom of the Pot

We know we’re biased, but we think this project is a soaring, powerful contribution to the conversation about our ever-changing region, told through the narratives of the farmers and cooks and waiters who did the work.

Jonathan Green, The Reception, 1989.

The Landscape of my Ancestors

“Anytime you look into my work and you see a simple A-frame house with a porch on it, that’s my grandmother’s house. “

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What Wealth Is

Wrap up National Poetry Month with this piece by Rebecca Gayle Howell, delivered at our 19th Southern Foodways Symposium.

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The Harkers Island Watermen

On Harkers Island, a tight-knit community that holds fast to its traditions, Morales might have once been thought an outsider. Not now.

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A Meal at Della’s Place

Della McCullers’ boardinghouse holds sophisticated stories of business acumen, community patronage, and everyday foodways that brim with a sense of place and purpose.

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Charlotte in Five Tamales

A region that has reinvented itself again and again since the Civil War is now in the midst of a newcomer revolution, as people of every background move here from across the United States and around the globe.

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Searching for Soul-Food in the Once Chocolate City

For the first time in almost sixty years, Washington D.C.’s black population is now less than 50 percent. In a city whose foodways originate in Southern and African American sensibilities, Ralph Eubanks ponders what impact the population shift is having on the restaurant scene.